Part 1: We’re Moving


I know you may not want to read another post about Casey’s allergies, but I want to share what works and what doesn’t work.

wpid-a-dog-allergies-75.jpg

First, an update from an earlier post titled “Supplements: Good Buy or Impulsive Purchase.” I would definitely buy Olewo’s Dehydrated Carrots & Red Beets again just for some added veggies. And, here are 2 more tasty dehydrated treats from Orijen and Stella & Chewy’s that I like to crumble on their kibble.

Azmira’s Aller’G Free did not help Casey at all, but Vetoquinol’s AllerG-3 was a great buy. Because I like the Vetoquinol brand, I purchased Vetoquinol’s Select Antioxidant. Unfortunately, Casey had an allergic reaction, and I had to stop giving him this product immediately. It has “Natural and Artificial Flavors.” I contacted Vetoquinol, but I received no response.

I started researching natural supplements again and found the following article:
http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/natures-benadryl-quercetin/

Quercetin, Bromelain, Papain, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, & Coconut Oil (*) . . . are these the magic ingredients to help with allergens (ear infections, excessive paw chewing/licking, hot spots, itchy skin, scratching, & watery eyes) when used in combination? (*) Coconut oil can be mixed in food and/or rubbed on skin.

I think this combination of supplements helped, because Casey’s symptoms went from better to worse immediately after he finished his last Quercetin capsule. Unfortunately, Quercetin isn’t meant to be taken on a long-term basis.

So, what should I try next to control Casey’s allergies? I could get back to the basics. We need vitamins, so doesn’t it make sense our pets do, too? Read about the benefits of Biotin (Vitamin B) & Omega 3’s. I did try the Biotin product early on, but I realize now though that I was not increasing the suggested dosage as he grew. I should have given him 1 tablet per 15 lbs.

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article.cfm?aid=1445

http://www.nickersinternational.com/Does_your_pet_suffer_from_biotin_deficiency_s/23.htm

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=q2+2111&aid=137

In an article from Healthy Pets with Dr. Karen Becker, she stated

The more your pet is exposed to the allergens he’s sensitive to, the more intense and long-lasting his allergic response becomes.

wpid-a_allergies_pet_guide_2.jpg

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/06/22/pets-seasonal-allergies.aspx
(This article is similar to another article by Dr Becker that I shared a link to in my post, “Allergy Do’s and Don’ts.”)

Limiting your pet’s exposure to his allergens is most effective, but not usually practical – it may mean relocating to a different climate!

http://www.skinvetclinic.com/atopicdermatitis.html

So, I don’t know where we’re moving to yet, but I have till August 27th to try and find a place without carpet (Casey’s #1 allergy). To be continued in “Moving: Part 2” . . . .

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